Tagged: employment agreement

Canadian Compensation Arrangements – When Do I Need U.S. Counsel?

Imagine a Canadian company adopts a deferred share unit plan (DSU Plan) for its directors.  At the time the plan is adopted, the company does not have the plan reviewed by U.S. counsel, because none of their directors reside in the U.S.  It is not until several years later that the company learns that one of its directors, despite living in Canada, has dual citizenship with the U.S.  Because the typical form of Canadian DSU Plan will not comply with U.S. tax laws governing deferred compensation, particularly U.S. Internal Revenue Code Section 409A (Section 409A), the company has quite a mess on its hands.  You can read our prior articles on common payment timing issues...

U.S. National Labor Relations Board Restricts Confidentiality and Non-Disparagement Terms for Separation and Release Agreements

Employers have frequently included confidentiality and non-disparagement terms in their separation and release agreements. Confidentiality terms help ensure that employees won’t brag to coworkers about large payouts and encourage them to seek similar payouts. Such payouts can also give the impression that a company is looking to avoid exposure for wrongdoing, and confidentiality terms can help maintain the privacy of such payouts. Non-disparagement terms can help companies deter departing employee from publically trashing their former employers on their way out the door. Employees don’t always leave on good terms and non-disparagement terms can help incent employees to keep their negative opinions to themselves. U.S. employers, however, must re-evaluate their use of confidentiality and...

Employment Terms and Terminations: It’s Different in the States

Employers sometimes include fixed terms of employment in their employment agreement. Sometimes a fixed term is meant to prompt the parties to renegotiate at the end of the term. Sometimes a fixed term is meant to document the point in time where the parties have, in fact, agreed that the employment will end. Sometimes a fixed term is designed to create a point in time where the employer can end the employment without having to pay severance. But sometimes employers include a fixed term in an employment agreement without carefully considering the legal consequences. Under U.S. law, those consequences can be significant. One fundamental difference between employment law in Canada and employment law...

Termination for Cause in the United States: It’s Whatever You Want it to Be

The default rule in most U.S. states is at-will employment. This means that either the employee or the employer may terminate the employment relationship at any time, without notice, for any reason—other than a discriminatory or retaliatory reason. A reason is discriminatory if it is based upon an individual’s status as a member of a protected class, such as race, gender, national origin, or religion. A reason is retaliatory if it relates to an individual’s protected activity, such as whistleblowing or raising concerns regarding the terms and conditions of employment. Parties can opt out of the default at-will rule by entering into an employment agreement that provides the employee with severance unless the...